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ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE THREATS in the United States, 2013

tomAntimicrobial resistance is one of our most serious health threats. Infections from resistant bacteria are now too common, and some pathogens have even become resistant to multiple types or classes of antibiotics (antimicrobials used to treat bacterial infections). The loss of effective antibiotics will undermine our ability to fight infectious diseases and manage the infectious complications common in vulnerable patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer, dialysis for renal failure, and surgery, especially organ transplantation, for which the ability to treat secondary infections is crucial.
When first-line and then second-line antibiotic treatment options are limited by resistance or are unavailable, healthcare providers are forced to use antibiotics that may be more toxic to the patient and frequently more expensive and less effective. Even when alternative treatments exist, research has shown that patients with resistant infections are often much more likely to die, and survivors have significantly longer hospital stays, delayed recuperation, and long-term disability. Efforts to prevent such threats build on the foundation of proven public health strategies: immunization, infection control, protecting the food supply, antibiotic stewardship, and reducing person-to-person spread through screening, treatment and education.

Dr. Tom Frieden, MD, MPH
Director, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Meeting the Challenges of Drug-Resistant Diseases in Developing Countries
Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Human Rights,
and International Organizations
United States House of Representatives
April 23, 2013

ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE THREATS in the United States, 2013

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